New york times best selling books 2014

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new york times best selling books 2014

Jack Morgan and Justine Smith search for a high-powered celebrity couple who have disappeared. The psychologist and police consultant Alex Delaware becomes embroiled in a child custody dispute that escalates into murder. The basis for the movie. First published in ; the basis for the movie. The former defense secretary recounts his experience serving Presidents Bush and Obama during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The narrative, first published in , of a freeman who was kidnapped and sold into slavery, and spent 12 years in bondage before escaping; the basis of the recently released movie. Shocking truths emerge after a high-powered celebrity couple disappear from their luxurious ranch and Jack Morgan and Justine Smith are secretly flown in to search for them.
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NYT Book Review’s Ten Best Books of 2014

The 10 Best Books of 2015

Lucas Davenport investigates when multiple bodies are found in the middle of the Minnesota cornfields. As the government hit man Will Robie and his partner, Jessica Reel, prepare for a mission, they face a new adversary. A woman disappears on the day of her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer? An analysis of centuries of economic history predicts worsening inequality. The story of a woman kidnapped in Cleveland in , then tortured, who escaped in

An aging photographer rents a rural cottage and discovers sparks of creativity and desire. A rogue C. First published in ; the basis for the movie. The basis for the movie. The former defense secretary recounts his experience serving Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The narrative, first published in , of a freeman who was kidnapped and sold into slavery, and spent 12 years in bondage before escaping; the basis of the recently released movie.

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Impressively, it is also a vastly entertaining feat of storytelling. Wry and devastating in equal measure, the novel is a cracked mirror that throws light in every direction — on music and literature; science and philosophy; marriage and motherhood and infidelity; and especially love and the grueling rigors of domestic life. In , the anthropologist Margaret Mead took a field trip to the Sepik River in New Guinea with her second husband; they met and collaborated with the man who would become her third. King has taken the known details of that actual event and created this exquisite novel, her fourth, about the rewards and disappointments of intellectual ambition and physical desire. The result is an intelligent, sensual tale told with a suitable mix of precision and heat. Deeply unnerving and gorgeously tender, the book chronicles how grief renders the parents unable to cherish and raise their other son; love, it suggests, becomes warped and jagged and even seemingly vanishes in the midst of mourning. In this brilliant debut story collection, Klay — a former Marine who served in Iraq — shows what happens when young, heavily armed Americans collide with a fractured and deeply foreign country few of them even remotely understand.

Szabo, who died in , first published her novel in , in the last years of Communist rule; this supple translation shows how a story about two women in 20th-century Hungary can resonate in a very different time and place. This revelatory collection gathers 43 of them, introducing her to a wider audience as an uncompromising and largehearted observer of life whose sympathies favor smart, mouthy women struggling to get by much as Berlin herself — an alcoholic who raised four sons on her own — frequently did. A divorced woman traveling in Greece, our narrator, talks — or rather listens — to the people she meets, absorbing their stories of love and loss, deception, pride and folly. Coates writes to his son with a cleareyed realism about the beautiful and terrible struggle that inheres in flesh and bone. If sugar was the defining commodity of the 18th century and oil of the 20th, then surely cotton was king in the 19th century. In this sweeping, ambitious and disturbing survey , Beckert takes us through every phase of a global industry that has relied on millions of miserably treated slaves, sharecroppers and millworkers to turn out its product. The industrialization of cotton rested on violence, Beckert tells us, and its story is that of the development of the modern world itself.

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